Cambridge English Department manager

Cambridge Department Manager - Ksenia Khitrikova
k.khitrikova@lt-pro.ru

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Exams

  • Cambridge English: YLE (Young Learners Exams) 

    Giving children a head start in English
    Starters | Movers | Flyers

    Cambridge English: Young Learners is a series of fun, motivating English language tests, aimed at children in primary and lower-secondary education. There are three activity-based tests – Starters, Movers and Flyers. This gives students a clear path to improve in English.

  • Cambridge English: Key (KET) 

     

    A Cambridge English: Key (KET) qualification is proof of your ability to use English to communicate in simple situations.

    The exam tests all four English language skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking.

    A Cambridge English: Key certificate shows that you can:

    • understand and use basic phrases and expressions

    • understand simple written English

    • introduce yourself and answer basic questions about yourself

    • interact with English speakers at a basic level.

    Reasons to choose Cambridge English: Key:

    • Gain a valuable qualification that is accepted worldwide.

    • Improve your work, study and travel prospects.

    • Show that you have the basic language skills you need to communicate in English.

    • Cambridge English: Key is made up of three papers developed to test your English skills. You can see exactly what is in each paper below.

    Paper

    Content

    Marks
    (% of total)

    Purpose

    Reading and Writing
    (1 hour 10 minutes)
     

    9 parts/
    56 questions

    50%

    Shows you can understand simple written information such as signs, brochures, newspapers and magazines.

    Listening
    (30 minutes, including 8 minutes' transfer time)
     

    5 parts/
    25 questions

    25%

    Requires you to be able to understand announcements and other spoken material when people speak reasonably slowly.

    Speaking
    (8–10 minutes per pair of candidates)
     

    2 parts

    25%

    Shows you can take part in a conversation by answering and asking simple questions. Your Speaking test will be conducted face to face with one or two other candidates and two examiners. This makes your test more realistic and more reliable.


     

  • Cambridge English: Key (KET) for Schools 

    A Cambridge English: Key (KET) for Schools qualification shows that a student can use English to communicate in simple situations. It’s a logical next step after Cambridge English: Young Learners (YLE) and a good place for older children to start learning English too.

    The exam gives students the confidence to go on to study for higher-level English exams, such as Cambridge English: Preliminary (PET) for Schools.

    Cambridge English: Key for Schools is targeted at the same level as Cambridge English: Key (KET), but with content aimed at school-age learners rather than adults.

    A Cambridge English: Key for Schools qualification shows that a student can:

    • understand and use basic phrases and expressions

    • understand simple written English

    • introduce themselves and answer basic questions about themselves

    • interact with English speakers at a basic level.

    Reasons to choose Cambridge English: Key for Schools:

    • Helps students gain the language skills they need to succeed in study and work, at home or abroad.

    • Easily integrated into a school’s curriculum.

    • Part of a suite of exams that offer step-by-step progression for students.

    • Comprehensive support with exam preparation and administration.

    • Cambridge English: Key for Schools is made up of three papers developed to test students’ English skills. You can see exactly what’s in each paper below.

    Paper

    Content

    Marks
    (% of total)

    Purpose

    Reading and Writing
    (1 hour 10 minutes)
     

    9 parts/
    56 questions

    50%

    Shows a student can understand simple written information such as signs, brochures, newspapers and magazines. They will also have to fill gaps in simple sentences and write a short message or note.

    Listening
    (30 minutes, including 8 minutes' transfer time)
     

    5 parts/
    25 questions

    25%

    Requires a student to be able to understand announcements and other spoken material when people speak reasonably slowly.

    Speaking
    (8–10 minutes per pair of candidates)

     


     

     

    2 parts

    25%

    Tests a student’s ability to take part in a conversation by answering and asking simple questions. Their Speaking test will be conducted face to face with one or two other students. This makes their test more realistic and more reliable.


     

  • Cambridge English: Preliminary (PET) 

    A Cambridge English: Preliminary (PET) qualification shows that you have mastered the basics of English and now have practical language skills for everyday use.

    This exam is the logical step in your language learning journey between Cambridge English: Key (KET) and Cambridge English: First (FCE).

    A Cambridge English: Preliminary qualification shows that you can:

    • read simple textbooks and articles in English

    • write letters and emails on everyday subjects

    • take meeting notes

    • show awareness of opinions and mood in spoken and written English.

    Reasons to choose Cambridge English: Preliminary:

    • Develop your ability to communicate in English for practical tasks and situations.

    • Gain a valuable qualification that is accepted worldwide.

    • Improve your work, study and travel prospects.

    • Cambridge English: Preliminary (PET) is made up of three papers developed to test your English skills. You can see exactly what’s in each paper below.


     


     


     

    Paper

    Content

    Marks
    (% of total)

    Purpose

    Reading and Writing
    (1 hour 30 minutes)
     

    Reading:
    5 parts/
    35 questions

    Writing:
    3 parts/
    7 questions

    50%

    Shows you can read and understand the main points from signs, newspapers and magazines, and can use vocabulary and structure correctly.

    Listening
    (30 minutes, including 6 minutes' transfer time)
     

    4 parts/
    25 questions

    25%

    You have to be able to follow and understand a range of spoken materials including announcements and discussions about everyday life.

    Speaking
    (10–12 minutes per pair of candidates)
     

    4 parts

    25%

    Shows how good your spoken English is as you take part in conversation by asking/answering questions and talking, for example, about your likes and dislikes. Your Speaking test will be conducted face to face with one or two other candidates and two examiners. This makes your test more realistic and more reliable.


     


     

     

     

  • Preliminary for Schools (PET for Schools) 

    A Cambridge English: Preliminary (PET) for Schools qualification shows that a student has mastered the basics of English and now has practical language skills for everyday use.

    This exam is the logical step in a student’s language learning journey between Cambridge English: Key (KET) for Schools and Cambridge English: First (FCE) for Schools.

    Cambridge English: Preliminary (PET) for Schools is targeted at the same CEFR level as Cambridge English: Preliminary (PET) but with content aimed at school-age learners rather than adults.

    A Cambridge English: Preliminary for Schools qualification shows that a student can:

    • read simple textbooks and articles in English

    • write letters and emails on everyday subjects

    • understand factual information

    • show awareness of opinions and mood in spoken and written English.

    Reasons to choose Cambridge English: Preliminary for Schools:

    • Easily integrated into a school’s curriculum.

    • Part of a suite of exams that offer step-by-step progression for students.

    • Comprehensive support in exam preparation and administration.


     

    Cambridge English: Preliminary for Schools is made up of three papers developed to test students’ English skills. You can see exactly what’s in each paper below.

    Paper

    Content

    Marks
    (% of total)

    Purpose

    Reading and Writing
    (1 hour 30 minutes)
    See sample paper

    Reading:
    5 parts/
    35 questions

    Writing:
    3 parts/
    7 questions

    50%

    Students need to be able to read texts from signs, newspapers and magazines and understand the main points. They will need to show they can use vocabulary and structure by completing tasks such as producing a short message, and writing a story or letter of around 100 words.

    Listening
    (about 30 minutes plus 6 minutes' transfer time)
    See sample paper

    4 parts/
    25 questions

    25%

    Students need to show they can understand the meaning of a range of recorded spoken material, including announcements, interviews and discussions about everyday life. They will also need to be able to understand the attitudes and intentions of the speakers.

    Speaking
    (10–12 minutes per pair of candidates)
    See sample paper

    4 parts

    25%

    Students take part in a conversation, asking and answering questions, and talking freely about their likes and dislikes. They take the Speaking test with another candidate or in a group of three.


     

  • First Certificate in English(FCE) 

    A Cambridge English: First (FCE) qualification proves you have the language skills to live and work independently in an English-speaking country or study on courses taught in English.

    This exam is the logical step in your language learning journey between Cambridge English: Preliminary (PET) and Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE).

    A Cambridge English: First qualification shows that you can:

    • communicate effectively face-to-face, expressing opinions and presenting arguments

    • follow the news

    • write clear, detailed English, expressing opinions and explaining the advantages and disadvantages of different points of view

    • write letters, reports, stories and lots of other types of text.

    Reasons to choose Cambridge English: First:

    • Accepted for entry to foundation/pathway/pre-sessional courses in English-speaking countries.

    • Accepted for entry to undergraduate programmes taught in the medium of English in non-English-speaking countries.

    • Results available in as little as two weeks.

    • Cambridge English: First (FCE) is a test of all areas of language ability.

    • The updated exam (for exam sessions from January 2015) is made up of four papers developed to test your English language skills. You can see exactly what’s in each paper below.

    • The Speaking test is taken face to face, with two candidates and two examiners. This creates a more realistic and reliable measure of your ability to use English to communicate.

    Paper

    Content

    Purpose

    Reading and Use of English (1 hour 15 minutes)
     

    7 parts/52 questions

    Shows you can deal confidently with different types of text, such as fiction, newspapers and magazines. Tests your use of English with tasks that show how well you can control your grammar and vocabulary.

    Writing
    (1 hour 20 minutes)
     

    2 parts

    Requires you to be able to produce two different pieces of writing, such as letters, reports, reviews and essays.

    Listening
    (about 40 minutes)
     

    4 parts/30 questions

    Requires you to be able to follow and understand a range of spoken materials, such as news programmes, presentations and everyday conversations.

    Speaking
    (14 minutes per pair of candidates)
     

    4 parts

    Tests your ability to communicate effectively in face to face situations. You will take the Speaking test with one or two other candidates.


     

  • First Certificate in English (FCE) for Schools 

    A Cambridge English: First (FCE) for Schools qualification shows that a student has the language skills they need to communicate in an English-speaking environment.

    It’s also a great way to prepare for higher-level exams such as Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE).

    Cambridge English: First for Schools is targeted at the same CEFR level as Cambridge English: First (FCE) but with content aimed at school-age learners rather than adults.

    A Cambridge English: First for Schools qualification shows that students can:

    • communicate effectively face to face, expressing opinions and presenting arguments

    • write clear, detailed English, expressing opinions and explaining the advantages and disadvantages of different points of view

    • follow the news

    • write letters, reports, stories and lots of other types of text.

    Reasons to choose Cambridge English: First for Schools:

    • Easily integrated into a school’s curriculum.

    • Part of a suite of exams that offer step-by-step progression for students.

    • Comprehensive support with exam preparation and administration.

    • Students can gain a valuable qualification that is accepted worldwide

    • The updated Cambridge English: First for Schools exam (for exam sessions from January 2015) is made up of four papers developed to test students' English language skills. You can see exactly what’s in each paper below.


     

    Paper

    Content

    Purpose

    Reading and Use of English
    (1 hour 15 minutes)
     

    7 parts/52 questions

    Students need to be able to understand a range of texts, including how they are organised and the opinions and attitudes expressed in them. The texts will be from sources familiar to school-aged learners, such as magazines, articles, fiction and advertisements, but targeted at the interests of students.

    Students’ use of English will be tested by tasks which show how well they can control their grammar and vocabulary.

    Writing
    (1 hour 20 minutes)
     

    2 parts

    Students are required to produce two pieces of writing. The first piece is compulsory and will be an essay of 140–190 words. For the second, they can choose from an article, email/letter, essay, review or story of 140–190 words.

    Listening
    (about 40 minutes)
     

    4 parts/30 questions

    Requires being able to follow and understand a range of familiar spoken materials, such as news programmes, public announcements and other sources, but targeted at the interests of school-aged learners.

    Speaking
    (14 minues per pair of candidates)
     

    4 parts

    A face to face test taken with one or two other candidates and an examiner. Students have to show how well they can produce spontaneous spoken language, talking with either the examiner, the other candidate, or by themselves.


     

  • Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) 

    The demand for high-level English language skills is increasing all around the world. Passing Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) shows that you are a high achiever.

    • Accepted globally as proof of high achievement.
      More than 6,000 educational institutions, businesses and government departments around the world accept Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) as proof of high-level achievement.

    • A certificate with endless opportunities.
      Helps you develop the language skills you need for success, and can be used for your university and student visa applications in the UK and Australia.

    • It provides high-level English skills for academic and professional success.
      Preparing for Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) helps learners develop the skills to make the most of studying, working and living in English-speaking countries.

    How students, universities and schools all benefit:

    • A level of English for demanding study and work environments.
      Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) shows that a student has the language ability to carry out complex research, communicate effectively at a professional level – and stand out from the crowd.

    • Real-life English language skills.
      Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) offers proof of the English skills that education institutions and employers seek for high-achieving study and work situations. 

    • Worldwide availability.
      There are 37 exam dates every year, at 1,400 exam centres in 117 countries all over the world.

    • Comprehensive support for students and teachers.
      Students have access to free practice papers, and teachers can download free lesson plans, worksheets, games and classroom activities.

    • High-quality assessment.
      From a department of the University of Cambridge. 

    Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE) is a thorough test of all areas of language ability. 

    The updated exam (for exam sessions from January 2015) is made up of four papers developed to test your English language skills. You can see exactly what’s in each paper below.

    The Speaking test is taken face-to-face, with two candidates and two examiners. This creates a more realistic and reliable measure of your ability to use English to communicate.

    Exam format at a glance:

    Paper

    Content

    Purpose

    Reading and Use of English (1 hour 30 minutes)

    8 parts/56 questions

    Shows you can deal confidently with different types of text, such as fiction, newspapers and magazines. Tests your use of English with different types of exercise that show how well you can control your grammar and vocabulary.

    Writing

    (1 hour 30 minutes)

    2 parts

    You create two different pieces of writing, such as essays, letters/emails, proposals, reports and reviews.

    Listening

    (about 40 minutes)

    4 parts/30 questions

    Tests your ability to follow and understand a range of spoken materials, such as interviews, radio broadcasts, presentations, talks and everyday conversations.

    Speaking

    (15 minutes per pair of candidates)

    4 parts

    Tests your ability to communicate effectively in face-to-face situations. You will take the Speaking test with another candidate.

    Your overall performance is calculated by averaging the scores you achieve in Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking and Use of English. The weighting of each of the four skills and Use of English is equal.

  • Cambridge English: Proficiency (CPE) 

    A Cambridge English: Proficiency (CPE) qualification shows the world that you have mastered English to an exceptional level. It proves you can communicate with the fluency and sophistication of a highly competent English speaker.

    Preparing for and passing the exam means you have the level of English that’s needed to study or work in a very senior professional or academic environment, for example on a postgraduate or PhD programme.

    A Cambridge English: Proficiency qualification shows that you can:

    • study demanding subjects at the highest level, including postgraduate and PhD programmes
    • negotiate and persuade effectively at senior management level in international business settings
    • understand the main ideas of complex pieces of writing
    • talk about complex or sensitive issues, and deal confidently with difficult questions.

    Reasons to choose Cambridge English: Proficiency:

    • This is our highest-level exam. Passing it proves that you have mastered English to an exceptional level.
    • Helps you to develop the English skills needed to succeed in very high level academic or professional environments.
    • Results available in as little as two weeks.

    Cambridge English: Proficiency is made up of four papers developed to test your English skills. You can see exactly what is in each paper below.

    Paper Content Purpose

    Reading and Use of English
    (1 hour 30 minutes)
     

    7 parts/
    53 questions
    Shows you can deal confidently with different types of text, such as fiction and non-fiction books, journals, newspapers and manuals.

    Writing
    (1 hour 30 minutes)
     

    2 parts Requires you to be able to write a variety of text types, such as essays, reports and reviews.

    Listening
    (about 40 minutes)
     

    4 parts/
    30 questions
    Requires you to be able to follow and understand a range of spoken materials, such as lectures, speeches and interviews.

    Speaking
    (16 minutes per pair of candidates)
     

    3 parts Tests your ability to communicate effectively in face-to-face situations.
  • Cambridge English: Business Preliminary ( BEC P) 

    Cambridge English: Business Certificates are designed to give you practical skills to help you succeed in English-speaking international business environments.

    Cambridge English: Business Preliminary, also known as Business English Certificate (BEC) Preliminary, is the first of the three certificates. It is an intermediate level exam.

    Cambridge English: Business Preliminary

     

    Why take the exam?

    People throughout the world take Cambridge English: Business Preliminary to improve their employment and career opportunities.

     

    Cambridge English: Business Preliminary is made up of three papers developed to test your English skills. You can see exactly what is in each paper below.

    Paper Content

    Marks
    (% of total)

    Purpose

    Reading and Writing
    (1 hour 30 minutes)

    Reading: 7 parts

    Writing: 2 parts

    50%

    Shows you can read and understand the main points from graphs or charts, messages and emails, and can use vocabulary and structure correctly. You are also required to be able to produce two short pieces of writing: an internal communication, such as a note or a message, and some business correspondence, such as an email or a letter.

    Listening
    (about 40 minutes, including transfer time)

    4 parts

    25%

    Requires you to be able to follow and understand a range of spoken materials including interviews and discussions about everyday life.

    Speaking
    (12 minutes per pair of candidates)

    3 parts

    25%

    Shows your spoken English as you take part in conversation, asking and answering questions, and talking freely about your opinions, for example, when discussing business-related topics. Your Speaking test will be face-to-face with one or two other candidates. This makes your test more realistic and more reliable.

  • Cambridge English: Business Vantage ( BEC V) 

    Cambridge English: Business Certificates are designed to give you practical skills to help you succeed in English-speaking international business environments.

    Cambridge English: Business Vantage, also known as Business English Certificate (BEC) Vantage, is the second of the three certificates. It is an upper-intermediate level exam.

    Why take the exam?

    People throughout the world take Cambridge English: Business Vantage to improve their employment and career opportunities.

    Cambridge English: Business Vantage is made up of four papers developed to test your English skills. You can see exactly what is in each paper below.

    Paper Content

    Marks
    (% of total)

    Purpose

    Reading
    (1 hour)

    5 parts 25% Shows you can deal confidently with different types of text, such as business publications and correspondence.

    Writing
    (45 minutes)

    2 parts 25% Requires you to be able to produce two different pieces of writing, such as letters, reports, proposals and emails.

    Listening
    (about 40 minutes, including transfer time)

    3 parts 25% Requires you to be able to follow and understand a range of spoken materials, such as interviews, discussions and presentations.

    Speaking
    (14 minutes per pair of candidates)

    3 parts 25% Tests your ability to communicate effectively in face-to-face situations. You will take the Speaking test with one or two other candidates.
  • Cambridge English: Business Higher (BEC H) 

    Cambridge English: Business Certificates are designed to give you practical skills to help you succeed in English-speaking international business environments.

    Cambridge English: Business Higher, also known as Business English Certificate (BEC) Higher, is the third of the three certificates. It is a high level exam.

    Why take the exam?

    People throughout the world take Cambridge English: Business Higher to improve their employment and career opportunities.

    Cambridge English: Business Higher is made up of four papers developed to test your English skills. You can see exactly what is in each paper below.

    Paper Content

    Marks
    (% of total)

    Purpose
    Reading (1 hour) 6 parts 25% Shows you can deal confidently with different types of text.
    Writing (1 hour 10 minutes) 2 parts 25% You need to be able to write a variety of different items such as memos, letters, emails, reports and proposals.
    Listening (about 40 minutes, including transfer time) 3 parts 25% You need to be able to follow and understand a range of spoken materials, such as presentations, interviews and discussions.
    Speaking (16 minutes per pair of candidates) 3 parts 25% Tests your ability to communicate effectively in face-to-face situations. Your Speaking test will be face-to-face with one or two other candidates. This makes your test more realistic and more reliable.
  • Cambridge English: TKT (Teaching Knowledge Test) 

    TKT (Teaching Knowledge Test) will help you to teach English to schoolchildren and adult learners at home or around the world. Use TKT to increase your confidence as a teacher and improve your job prospects.

    Why take TKT?

    Find out why TKT is so popular with teachers around the world.

    Core modules

    TKT: Module 1

    Background to language teaching

    What does TKT: Module 1 test?
    This module tests your knowledge of the terms and concepts of English language teaching. It focuses on the factors underpinning the learning of English.

    The test
    TKT: Module 1 has one paper. It lasts 1 hour 20 minutes and has 80 questions. The test is divided into three parts:

    • describing language and language skills (40 questions)
    • background to language learning (15 questions)
    • background to language teaching (25 questions).

    TKT: Module 2

    Planning for language teaching

    What does TKT: Module 2 test?
    This module focuses on the knowledge and skills you need to plan a lesson or a series of lessons.

    This module also refers to assessment and focuses on resources that can guide you in your lesson planning.

    The test
    TKT: Module 2 has one paper. It lasts 1 hour 20 minutes and has 80 questions. The test is divided into two parts:

    • planning and preparing a lesson or a sequence of lessons (40 questions)
    • selection and use of resources (40 questions).

    TKT: Module 3 Classroom management

    What does TKT: Module 3 test?
    This module tests:

    • knowledge of what happens in the classroom during language learning
    • the teacher’s role in classroom management
    • methods used to manage and make the most of interactions in the classroom.

    The test
    TKT: Module 3 has one paper. It lasts 1 hour 20 minutes and has 80 questions. The test is divided into two parts:

    • teachers’ and learners’ language in the classroom (40 questions)
    • classroom management (40 questions).

    Specialist modules

    TKT: Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL)

    What is TKT: CLIL?
    TKT: CLIL tests the understanding of teaching curriculum subjects through the medium of a second or third language.

    What does TKT: CLIL test?
    TKT: CLIL tests knowledge about content teaching in a target language, and the learning, thinking and language skills which are developed across different curriculum subjects. TKT: CLIL tests knowledge of lesson planning and the understanding of activities and resources needed to support a CLIL approach. It also tests knowledge of lesson delivery and how assessment is carried out in CLIL contexts.

    The test
    TKT: CLIL has one paper. It lasts 1 hour 20 minutes and has 80 questions. The test is divided into four parts:

    • knowledge of the principles of CLIL
    • lesson preparation in a CLIL context
    • lesson delivery
    • assessment.

    TKT: Young Learners

    What is TKT: Young Learners?
    TKT: Young Learners is a test of the knowledge of the strategies and skills required to teach young learners.

    TKT: Young Learners is ideal if you are an international teacher working in primary education.

    What does TKT: Young Learners test?
    TKT: Young Learners tests the background knowledge related to teaching young learners of between 6–12 years of age. It also tests understanding of planning lessons, different teaching strategies and assessing learning.

    The test
    This module has one paper. It lasts 1 hour 20 minutes and has 80 questions. The test is divided into four parts:

    • learning and development
    • planning lessons
    • teaching strategies
    • classroom-based assessment.
  • Delta (Diploma in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) 

    Delta is one of the best-known and most popular advanced TEFL/TESOL qualifications in the world. It is a flexible way for experienced English language teachers to progress further in their careers. Delta can be taken at any stage in a teacher’s career and is ideal for those wanting to update their teaching knowledge and improve their practice.

    There are three Delta Modules, with a choice of two options for Module Three:

    Module One Understanding Language, Methodology and Resources for Teaching
    Module Two Developing Professional Practice
    Module Three

    Option 1: Extending Practice and ELT Specialism
    Option 2: English Language Teaching Management

    Module 1

    Understanding Language, Methodology and Resources for Teaching (20 credits)

    This module focuses on the background to teaching and learning English in a range of contexts.

    Content areas
    • Theoretical perspectives on language acquisition and language teaching
    • Different approaches and methodologies, including current developments
    • Language systems and learners’ linguistic problems
    • Language skills and learners’ problems
    • Knowledge of resources, materials and reference sources for language learning
    • Key concepts and terminology related to assessment.
    Assessment

    Module One is a written examination which includes two 90-minute written papers with a 30-minute break between each paper. The examination is externally set and marked.

    Preparation

    You can prepare for Module One by:

    • following a course at one of the approved centres
    • reading and studying independently using English language and teaching methodology reference books.